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Starting the monotype process

May 9, 2013

Day 2 of the Wingtip Press Workshop:

After working for a full day on reductive drawings, we were ready to start the 3 color reduction monotype (also referred to as  “stacked monotypes”). Since I didn’t bring along specific images, I chose to work from the previous days pepper drawing.

I should also mention Rose learned from Vinita Voogd who pioneered this process. Vinita taught at Wingtip Press  last year.

Fearless leader Rose Davies lead us through the inking process. She combined 60% weight Graphic Chemical Litho Process Yellow to 40% plate oil. After mixing thoroughly, she used a soft brayer to apply a thin coat to the plate.

Rose inking Perspex (plexiglass) plate in yellow

Rose inking Perspex (plexiglass) plate in yellow

To check ink application, Rose held the plate up to a light. If splotchy, she could continue rolling the brayer over the plate to achieve an even coverage. Just keep your fingertips off the corners! This was the process used for all 3 plates.

Checking coverage of ink

Checking coverage of ink

My print: A photocopy of the pepper was placed on top of a light box.  This would be my guide in creating the print. To create a solid registration system, Rose recommended using 8-10 layers of tape  along two sides. Yowza! That’s a lot of tape! The tape remained in place through all 3 colors. This is key to keeping everything aligned throughout the process.

A photocopy of my drawing with tape registration guides

A photocopy of my drawing with tape registration guides

After inking the plate, I placed it over the photocopy and set about removing all areas to remain white, red, blue & purple using Q-Tips. Whew! Kind of tough to keep straight in the brain! I also used tarlatan (scrim), sponges, paper towels and kebab skewers for texture/ink removal. The below image is the yellow plate placed on top of dry paper ready to be put through the intaglio press.

First plate ready to run through the press. It's already placed on the paper.

First plate ready to run through the press. It’s already placed on the paper.

Working the red plate: I was removing the white areas and places to remain yellow, blue and green.

Working on red ink plate over the light box.

Working on red ink plate over the light box.

Red plate placed on top of the yellow print. You can see the areas that will blend to make orange. I used a lot of Q-Tips for the entire process!

Red plate situated on top of the first yellow print. Ready to run through the press!

Red plate situated on top of the first yellow print. Ready to run through the press!

Blue plate now in process: removal of white, red, orange & yellow zones. Plus toning down the blue so it doesn’t overpower any of the under colors.

Final plate in process.

Final plate in process.

Blue plate ready to run through the press.

Blue plate over the top of the first 2 colors.

Blue plate over the top of the first 2 colors.

Now the finished print.  Overall, this was a challenging process to go through and keep straight. I didn’t manage the black-black background I had hoped for. Part of that had to do with not applying enough ink onto the plates. Part could be from pressure. I also hadn’t planned what colors would go where so the image just developed as I went along. Kind of wild and crazy for me!

Finished image! Monotype pepper by Gale Everett

Finished image! Monotype pepper by Gale Everett

Each plate was run through the press twice to achieve 2 separate images. The first sheet captures the majority of the ink. The second produced whats referred to as a  ghost image. Basically a less saturated color image. Quite interesting!

Ghost image of pepper by Gale Everett

Ghost image of pepper by Gale Everett

One print down, two to go! What will I work on next????

🙂

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10 Comments leave one →
  1. La Femme Artiste permalink
    May 9, 2013 12:06 pm

    Wonderful photos, image results and step-by-step commentary!
    Where are you pursuing these experiences? Is it a class?
    I have a monotype project on the drawing board and would like guidance.

    • paperstew permalink*
      May 10, 2013 6:37 am

      Hopefully wordpress is working better this morning.
      Thanks for your comment. This process was from a workshop I took last week by visiting Welsh artist at Wingtip Press in Idaho. If you let me know what area of the world you live in, I bet there is someone in your area willing to help. Printers are like that.

  2. May 10, 2013 5:54 am

    It’s a lovely piece and a great technical write-up

    • paperstew permalink*
      May 10, 2013 6:33 am

      Thanks Rose! Couldn’t have done it with out your expert hand.

  3. May 10, 2013 5:56 am

    Reblogged this on scribblah and commented:
    A very clear explanation of the 3 colour monotype process and a lovely set of prints…….

  4. May 11, 2013 12:24 am

    A great description of the process. It is a bit like a suicide lino print, something I haven’t done for years, but am inspired to do the mono!

    • paperstew permalink*
      May 11, 2013 6:10 am

      Oh my, I had forgotten about that terminology! Yes, very much like a suicide lino. 🙂
      I’ll be posting 2 more prints I worked through during the workshop.
      Thanks so much for your comment!
      Gale

  5. May 13, 2013 12:12 am

    Absolutely great. 🙂

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